Is America Free, If A Privately-Owned Central Bank Controls Our Currency?

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency


Is America Free, If A Privately-Owned Central Bank Controls Our Currency?

Read full article at …

http://www.businessinsider.com/is-america-really-free-if-a-privately-owned-central-bank-controls-our-currency-and-runs-our-economy-2010-7

07-05-2010 • Businessinsider.com/ Reported by Jack Gregson

This weekend we celebrated America’s Independence Day. But are we really a free nation?
The truth is that it is really hard to argue that we are “free” when our currency system and our economy are run by an unelected privately-owned central bank. You see, the truth is that the U.S. government does not “print money” whenever it wants.
Under the current system, in order to get more U.S. currency, the U.S. government has to borrow it. The Federal Reserve creates the new currency out of thin air and then either keeps the “U.S. Treasury bonds” they get in return from the U.S. government or they sell them off to others. But what kind of sense does that make?

Why does a “free government” have to go into debt to print its own currency?

It is the U.S. government that should be printing U.S. currency – not a privately-owned bank called the Federal Reserve.

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

Where’s the dunce cap when we really need it …?

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

… Governor Brewer proves there is NO question Arizona ranks near the bottom of the barrel in education … and we continue to permit unchallenged such insane comment … why …?

Jan Brewer Claims Illegal Immigrants Are Beheading People

07-03-2010 • Youtube.com

Is Jan Brewer suggesting in a subtle way that Al Qaeda’s methods are being adopted by illegal immigrants in the Arizona desert?

… And ALL parties must, shall include “us” … that’s you and me …

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

… And ALL parties must, shall include “us” … that’s you and me …

Have all parties confer on snowmaking permit …Posted: Thursday, July 8, 2010 5:05 am

When it comes to a moving target, the snowmaking controversy at Arizona Snowbowl certainly fits the definition.

The latest wrinkle has the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the Forest Service, approving not just reclaimed wastewater but potable water, too. The idea is that the tribes, who consider the Peaks sacred, will be placated by knowing that the snow on the slopes, even though artificial, has not gone down a drain first.

The tribes, however, don’t seem impressed by the gesture — they have opposed commercial downhill skiing on the Peaks since the 1960s and aren’t likely to buy into an upgrade just because the snow is being made with drinking water.

As for Snowbowl, as Cyndy Cole reported Saturday, ski area executives at one point in the protracted permit process told the USDA it would be open to a purchase offer — for $47 million, or about 10 times what it sold for the last time it was on the market.

But at this point, Snowbowl is not for sale and executives are anxious to start construction this summer. They have said they will switch to potable water if the city of the Flagstaff is agreeable — and assuming the USDA pays the higher costs.

DIFFICULT POSITION …That puts city officials in a difficult position policywise. One of the main reasons the council approved the contract with Snowbowl back in 2002 was that it was for reclaimed wastewater. Not only had the city recently upgraded its wastewater treatment plants to produce an excess of treated water in the winter. But, also, the city was suffering a water shortage and the council could hardly justify sending drinking water to the Peaks for recreational skiing when it wasn’t sure it would have enough for local residents 25 years from now.

Since then, the council has paid close to $10 million for water rights on a ranch east of the city. But the quality of the water beneath Red Gap Ranch is still uncertain, and adjacent tribal landowners have asserted their own claims to the underlying aquifer.

Further, the cost of a pipeline and pumping stations could exceed $100 million, not counting easements, a price tag that would stretch Flagstaff’s municipal bonding capacity to the limit.

With those uncertainties about a sustainable city water supply in mind, the city water commission, an advisory body to the council, is unlikely to embrace the sale of potable water to Snowbowl.

It’s not that the volume — up to 1.5 million gallons a day for four months in the winter — would severely draw down municipal wells or Lake Mary. It’s the principle of not using drinking water for skiing in a semi-arid, high desert community that is likely to rule the day when the commission meets July 29.

LOOSE ENDS TO TIE UP …By then, snowmaking opponents might have already secured a restraining order postponing construction and making a subsequent city council decision less urgent. On the other hand, were the city to replace treated wastewater with drinking water, the basis for at least one court challenge would become moot.

So as noted above, the controversy continues to shape-shift as more players enter the legal and policy arena. Technically, Snowbowl has the green light to begin construction next week unless an injunction is granted.

But given the new option introduced by the USDA permit and its possible impact on legal, financial and policy strategies, we’d urge Snowbowl to hold off before cutting any trees up on the mountain.

There appear to be a lot of loose ends to tie up, and we’d hate to see something done today that we all might want to see undone tomorrow.

Our recommendation remains to get all parties to the same table to talk it out, not negotiate separately, as the Forest Service and now the USDA appear to have done. The worst that can happen is that they will agree to disagree and continue to see each other in court.

But who knows — a little more face-to-face communication just might produce some common understandings that will drive the issue forward in a more constructive fashion.

Posted in Editorial on Thursday, July 8, 2010 5:05 am Updated: 11:47 pm.

… What might this picture looked like today IF there had from the ‘get-go’ full, open, honest, disclosure and full transparency … oh, what tangled webs we weave when at first we choose to deceive …

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People should never be afraid of their government, government should always be afraid of the people.

To know that you do not know is the best. To pretend to know when you do not know is a disease. … Lao-tzu

Everyone has the RIGHT to clean & accessible water, adequate for the health & well-being of the individual and family & NO one shall be deprived of such access or quality of water due to individual economic circumstances

And let me be a bit bolder … I am most willing to present and discuss any water or wastewater issue with an audience in Arizona where honest two way dialog is permitted

Ergo … leadership incorporating and embracing “new” vision is required and who does Arizona have who can and will provide it…

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

Jan Brewer – Governor of Arizona – recently chose to eliminate the current Az Dept of Commerce and instead appoint her own “kitchen” cabinet of leader$ ostensibly to serve and to protect the interests of the citizens of the state of Arizona.

The articles in local print media indicates those chosen reads like a listing from the Old Phoenix 40, with Jerry Colangelo anointed one of the ring leaders to spearhead propelling Arizona from out of the economic maelstrom in which we currently are mired.

I write not to fault Mr. Colangelo’s business acumen but rather to inquire where is the “young” blood which Arizona so desperately needs to weather this current economic challenge.

Much of Mr. Colangelo’s accumulated wealth was generated via the largess of Phoenix citizen taxes to fund stadiums for his basketball and baseball ventures from which he generated appreciable personal wealth. While proving generous for Mr. Colangelo these ventures are neither great generators of large numbers of jobs nor spread uniformly throughout our state.

Creating tomorrow’s jobs requires extraordinary vision coupled with a keen sense of fairness. Many of tomorrow’s jobs for Arizona are yet to be invented, redefined, constructed, affirmed or even created.

Looking to government, as Mr. Colangelo, was so fortunate to do, to provide a$$i$tance most likely will not be a viable option given the generally precarious economic footing facing most all Arizona cities, towns and counties.

The economic paradigm facing Arizona today does not mirror the open-pocket-government-check-book approach to which Mr. Colangelo is familiar. Today’s economic paradigm requires leadership with “new” vision as the old one has run its course. Mr. Colangelo could, if he chose, serve an invaluable service to Arizona, were he to be willing to see himself as a “sage” generously giving input to others on the pitfalls associated with remaining inexorable linked into a dying economic paradigm.

Arizona’s – tomorrow – “vision” need reflect how to integrate as well as provide quality education for all coupled with developing an economy where meaningful employment for all is available state-wide.

Solutions can no longer be based on us vs. them mentality, nor Phoenix vs the rest of Arizona, or Phoenix first and everyone else next, if at all. Tomorrow solutions need be inclusive and avoid exclusivity a prototype diametrically different than the one utilized today.

I offer the language tomorrow’s economy will utilize in Arizona will reflect a communication technology most likely foreign to men of Mr. Colangelo’s age, no disrespect intended. Today’s “twitter” will be gone before most of us even learn how to use its today’s infant form and from there new jobs, new business ventures will spring and “we” need have ready a economic format ready to integrate these new emerging forms.

Believing the mining industry will provide the jobs for Arizona citizens tomorrow is foolish as their demand on our water will divide us into armed camps, as will “big” ag and even computer chip manufacturers. These industrial activities have as a consequence of their endeavors creating a by-product which increasingly degrades in some cases both our air as well as our water. This is NOT sustainable and cannot long endure.

The life blood of Arizona is water and at one time the pristine quality of our air, but no longer. There is virtually NO source of water in our state which is NOT in some manner compromised – degraded – polluted. Anyone from Arizona Dept of Water Resources or Az. Dept of Environment Quality or Central Az. Project or Salt River Project or ???, care to refute this….?

Moreover our governmental agencies city, state and county do not or will not fully disclose nor provide complete transparency respecting our air and our water. Print media publishes with regularity “official” reports reputing the safeness and quality of their water and/or wastewater treatment and delivery systems. Notably lacking is disclosure on WHO actually chooses WHAT to disclose to you and therein a huge iceberg lives. That which they choose to show you belies the remaining 90% buried and hidden from your view. It is what you are NOT shown which in most cases has the greater long term deleterious health implications for you and me.

Any economic vision based on perpetuating “greed is good” scenario championed by many of today’s captain’s of the Arizona and American economy is doomed. That economic paradigm is wobbling ready to fall.

Leadership emerging from this paradigm is not “new” it’s a death sentence.

Ergo … leadership incorporating and embracing “new” vision is required and who does Arizona have who can and will provide it…

… I INVITE YOU TO CONTEMPLATE THE IMPLICATIONS AS … WATER AS BASIC HUMAN RIGHT IS REJECTED …

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

strong>…WATER THEFT AND THE BEGINNING OF THE END OF INDEPENDENT FAMILY CATTLE RANCHING … Marti Oakley (c)copyright 2010 …

… AS THE WATER WAR$ ESCALATE …
Reports are coming in from across the country, mostly from the 14 Western States where cattle ranching is a way of life, of water being diverted to other areas or regions and natural waterways being altered to allow the collection of water to be sold on the commodities markets depriving cattle ranchers of the much needed water for their herds.

While many a cattleman (not all) in the west are cheering the unlawful herding and slaughter of wild horses and burros believing that ending the existence of these animals would somehow increase their access to below fair market value grazing permits, a wholly separate plan was being put in place by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Now, don’t get too excited. You’ll probably still get some really, really cheap grazing permits….you just won’t be able to afford the water necessary for your herds without selling off a couple of your kids or grandkids. And no guarantees are made as to the quality of water you will have access to.

BLM, in collusion with municipalities, multi-national corporations and other stakeholders have been systematically laying claim to any and all water supplies: even what is contained in underground aquifers. What this means to you is this: Even if water appears on your land naturally, having come from a river, stream or aquifer now owned by these corporate stakeholders, you are committing theft.

They own the water and all rights to it. The fact that it shows up on your land and always has is now a moot point.

If the corporations who now claim to own the water can prove that it originated from a spring or stream, river or aquifer they have title to, can stop the flow of that water to your land so you can’t steal it from them.

This would be cheating them out of their profits under NAFTA/CAFTA regulations which put the rights of the investor above that of the individual or nation/state.

While many of us have kept a careful eye on the multiple attempts to pass such odious pieces of legislation such as Jim Oberstar’s (D)MN, ”Water Restoration Act” which would have given the corporate federal government title and control over all water, from any source whatsoever, including dried up lake beds and the rain off your roof, across the entire country, the behind the scenes activities of private multi-national corporations engaging with federal corporations has been operating non-stop.

After all, although the marketing plan for the restoration act was premised on “national security” and the phony threats of possible water poisoning by some foreign terrorist operating from a cave along side a poppy field in Afghanistan was waved in front of the public continually, the truth of the matter was and is that the UN declared water a commodity in 2007…not a human right, and surely not a right for your cattle herds.

All over the US water rights are being sold off to private corporations, which was the intent of the restoration act.

Privatizer’s were lined up and already negotiating with corporate federal agencies to seize control and sale of water; the various pieces of legislation were meant only to keep the public diverted while business went on as usual in the District of Criminals.

And don’t even think about trying to label this as a left vs, right, a liberal vs. conservative, or a Democrat vs, Republican issue. There is not one on either side of the isle who has lodged one complaint, filed one objection or spoken out publicly against this theft of our water for corporate profit.

Now then, lest you think that somehow your state government is going to come to your rescue, or that your local law enforcement is going to ride in like the cavalry to save the day and protect your rights to use of the water; think again. They will however, show up to defend whatever corporate enterprise has gotten its sticky greedy fingers into what was previously a given right.
And just as an aside: Did it not occur to any of you who have supported the eradication of these wild herds that a national and state asset was being destroyed, or that you might possibly be next in line for eradication?

The water rights being sold to foreign corporations and investors was perpetrated by your trusted public officials, both state and local.

Your local municipality had to sign off on these sales in exchange for as little as 5% of the initial profits.

BLM will be taking upwards of 80% of the profits (after all they are a corporation operating for profit) and foisting the costs of upkeep and construction of waterline diversions, onto the public.

To learn how much of your local water has been sold off without your knowledge, look to your local and state corporate agencies such as Land Management, Environmental Protection Agencies, State Asset Management agencies, and your local Department of Natural Resources or Land Development commissions.

These are just for starters. Find out who is colluding with the Bureau of Land Management to deprive you of your water rights.

NAFTA’s Investor “Rights”A Corporate Dream,A Citizen Nightmare … Chapter 11-NAFTA
http://multinationalmonitor.org/mm2001/01april/corp1.html … Investor Rights Over Citizen Rights
Chapter 7-CAFTA … http://www.globalexchange.org/campaigns/cafta/Investment.html
“Perhaps most alarming are the provisions in CAFTA that mirror those in the disastrous Chapter 11 of NAFTA. Under these rules, foreign corporations are given the power to legally challenge national and local laws which adversely affect the business of foreign investors, regardless of the role that such legislation has in meeting national social and development goals.

These suits are filed in closed trade tribunals presided over by un-elected trade bureaucrats – bypassing domestic court systems.

If the corporation wins, the accused government must then compensate the corporation in the amount of profits they claim to have lost – including hypothetical profits that they claim they would have made twenty years into the future!

These expansive investor protections confer new rights on MNCs that neither domestic companies nor citizens — who have to obey national laws — enjoy, creating a class of “supercitizenship” for foreign corporations at the expense of citizen sovereignty.”

http://www.canada.com/topics/news/world/story.html?id=b65b35fd-477f-4956-98f4-c17a46fe3e26&k=40211

UN rejects water as basic human right …The Harper government can declare victory after a United Nations meeting rejected calls for water to be recognized as a basic human right.

… I INVITE YOU TO CONTEMPLATE THE IMPLICATIONS AS … WATER AS BASIC HUMAN RIGHT IS REJECTED …

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

People should never be afraid of their government, government should always be afraid of the people.

To know that you do not know is the best. To pretend to know when you do not know is a disease. … Lao-tzu

Everyone has the RIGHT to clean & accessible water, adequate for the health & well-being of the individual and family & NO one shall be deprived of such access or quality of water due to individual economic circumstances

And let me be a bit bolder … I am most willing to present and discuss any water or wastewater issue with an audience in Arizona where honest two way dialog is permitted

…You choose … an elephant you won’t see or a 900# gorilla … ?

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

…You choose … an elephant you won’t see or a 900# gorilla … ?

CODEX ALIMENTARIUS: The Elephant in the Room that They Don’t Want You to See … 07-07-2010 • Barbara H. Peterson

Codex isn’t coming, it’s here! We are being lulled into complacency by consumer advocacy groups with declarations that Codex isn’t here yet, not to worry, while the elephant in the room is getting bigger all the time.

READ FULL STORY … http://survivingthemiddleclasscrash.wordpress.com/2010/07/07/codex-alimentarius-the-elephant-in-the-room-that-they-dont-want-you-to-see/

… I invite you to rent and view the movie … ERIN BROCKOVICH … offers another perspective on PGE’s underbelly and its relationship with hexavalent chromium … and PGE disdain for disclosure and transparency … it’s all about $$$ …

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

… I invite you to rent and view the movie … ERIN BROCKOVICH … offers another perspective on PGE’s underbelly and its relationship with hexavalent chromium … and PGE disdain for disclosure and transparency … it’s all about $$$ …

Plan shopped to clean contaminated water … by John Gutekunst … Monday, June 28, 2010 10:14 PM MST … Havasu News

The California Department of Toxic Substances Control is asking for public comments on a plan to remediate groundwater contamination near Pacific Gas & Electric’s Topock Compressor Station.

The plan they are considering would use injection wells to help convert the primary contaminant, hexavalent chromium, into a form of chromium that is less toxic and less soluble in water. The plan would also have injection wells pumping water into the ground to drive the contaminants to extraction wells.

The DTSC held a public meeting on the plan June 22 at the Parker Community/Senior Center. The Topock Compressor Station is located 12 miles southeast of Needles, Calif., and approximately 500 yards west of the Colorado River. It began operations in 1951, compressing natural gas for distribution to PG&E’s customers in central and northern California.

From 1951 to 1985, the utility used hexavalent chromium to control corrosion in the cooling towers and other equipment. The cooling tower wastewater was initially discharged into percolation beds in a dry wash area near the station.

Chromium is a metal found in rocks, soil and the tissues of plants and animals. Hexavalent chromium is toxic and is considered a human carcinogen.

In 1964, PG&E began treating the wastewater to remove the hexavalent chromium. In 1985, the company stopped using chromium-based anti-corrosive agents and replaced them with a phosphate-based solution.

In 1996, the company entered into a voluntary agreement with DTSC to investigate any contamination resulting from the station’s operations. Monitoring of groundwater and the Colorado River began in 1997.

The environmental investigations found a plume of contaminated groundwater extending northeast of the station, mostly under the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge and lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management. The plume lies approximately 80 to 175 feet below the ground surface, and is approximately 2,400 feet long and 1,300 feet wide.

In March 2004, PG&E began extracting contaminated groundwater to prevent it from reaching the Colorado River. Contamination has not been detected in the river itself.

DTSC Project Manager Aaron Yue told the audiences in Parker nine different clean-up options were considered. Among the factors taken into consideration was the proximity of the plume to the Colorado River, a source of freshwater to millions in the Southwest. Another consideration was the cultural significance of the area to local Native American tribes.

Yue said the alternative selected was to use injection wells to inject bacteria which will convert the hexavalent chromium into a less toxic chromium that is less soluble in water. Freshwater will be pumped into the treatment area from wells on the west side of the plume, and this will force the contaminated water into extraction wells located closer to the river.

The construction phase would take about three years, Yue said. The clean-up operations could take 110 years, but Yue said 29 years was more likely. The decommissioning phase could last two years, and long-term monitoring could go on for another 10 years.

PG&E will be providing the funds for the clean up. As part of the process, DTSC prepared three documents for public inspection: A Draft Statement of Basis which explains the reasoning for the proposed remedy and clean-up standards, a copy of the proposed plan, and a draft of the Environmental Impact Report. The project documents can be found in local public libraries in the area or online at http://www.dtsc-topock.com.

The period for public comments ends July 19. When it was time for comments from the audience at the Parker meeting, local resident Michael Tsosie spoke to the DTSC officials. He said much of the information was unclear. He added there appeared to be a disconnect between the tribal governments, the agencies involved in the clean-up, and local residents. Tsosie noted the Fort Mohave government had been in the lead among tribal governments in this matter, but they were upstream from the contaminated area. The Chemehuevi reservation and the Colorado River Indian reservation are both downstream from Topock. He noted the Colorado River is a source of wealth for the Mohaves and their way of life. He added they’ve been here since the beginning of time.

Tsosie said there are already other pollutants in the river, and chromium should not be added to the mix.

Whatever they did, Tsosie said the agencies involved should always bear in mind there are real people being affected by what they do.

“Remember, we are just like you,” he said. “We’ll have to live with what you do.”

Norman Shopay, who owns property in Lake Havasu City, also spoke at the meeting. He asked that DTSC extend the public comment period. He said he had not been able to find the documents in some of the local libraries.

Shopay said that, when he found the documents, they were difficult to read and understand. He suggested a special meeting to explain to people how to go through the documents.

A spokesman for PG&E, Jeff Smith, told the Pioneer the company endorses the whole process. He added they’ve been making some remediation efforts on their own for some time. He said it was important to the company to have the area cleaned up, and they wanted to take into consideration the concerns of all the parties involved.

Once the comment period is over, DTSC officials will review them and make needed revisions to the plan. The actual start of the remediation efforts should be in 2013.

Comments can be sent to Aaron Yue, Department of Toxic Substances Control, 5796 Corporate Ave., Cypress, Calif., 90630. His e-mail is Ayue@dtsc.ca.gov.

… Before you choose to believe that PG&E is committed to “doing-the-right-thing” check their track record …

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

… Before you choose to believe that PG&E is committed to “doing-the-right-thing” check their track record …

Plan in works for clean-up near Topock compressor station … By John Gutekunst … Wednesday, June 30, 2010 9:06 AM MST

The California Department of Toxic Substances Control is asking for public comments on a plan to remediate groundwater contamination near Pacific Gas & Electric’s Topock Compressor Station. The plan they are considering would use injection wells to help convert the primary contaminant, hexavalent chromium, into a form of chromium that is less toxic and less soluble in water. The plan would also have injection wells pumping water into the ground to drive the contaminants to extraction wells.

The DTSC held a public meeting on the plan June 22 at the Parker Community/Senior Center. The Topock Compressor Station is located 12 miles southeast of Needles, Calif., and approximately 500 yards west of the Colorado River. It began operations in 1951, compressing natural gas for distribution to PG&E’s customers in central and northern California.

From 1951 to 1985, the utility used hexavalent chromium to control corrosion in the cooling towers and other equipment. The cooling tower wastewater was initially discharged into percolation beds in a dry wash area near the station.

Chromium is a metal found in rocks, soil and the tissues of plants and animals. Hexavalent chromium is toxic and is considered a human carcinogen.

In 1964, PG&E began treating the wastewater to remove the hexavalent chromium. In 1985, the company stopped using chromium-based anti-corrosive agents and replaced them with a phosphate-based solution.

In 1996, the company entered into a voluntary agreement with DTSC to investigate any contamination resulting from the station’s operations. Monitoring of groundwater and the Colorado River began in 1997.

The environmental investigations found a plume of contaminated groundwater extending northeast of the station, mostly under the Havasu National Wildlife Refuge and lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management. The plume lies approximately 80 to 175 feet below the ground surface, and is approximately 2,400 feet long and 1,300 feet wide.

In March 2004, PG&E began extracting contaminated groundwater to prevent it from reaching the Colorado River. Contamination has not been detected in the river itself.

DTSC Project Manager Aaron Yue told the audiences in Parker nine different clean-up options were considered. Among the factors taken into consideration was the proximity of the plume to the Colorado River, a source of freshwater to millions in the Southwest. Another consideration was the cultural significance of the area to local Native American tribes.

Yue said the alternative selected was to use injection wells to inject bacteria which will convert the hexavalent chromium into a less toxic chromium that is less soluble in water. Freshwater will be pumped into the treatment area from wells on the west side of the plume, and this will force the contaminated water into extraction wells located closer to the river.

The construction phase would take about three years, Yue said. The clean-up operations could take 110 years, but Yue said 29 years was more likely. The decommissioning phase could last two years, and long-term monitoring could go on for another 10 years.

PG&E will be providing the funds for the clean up.

As part of the process, DTSC prepared three documents for public inspection: A Draft Statement of Basis which explains the reasoning for the proposed remedy and clean-up standards, a copy of the proposed plan, and a draft of the Environmental Impact Report. The project documents can be found in local public libraries in the area or online at http://www.dtsc-topock.com.

The period for public comments ends July 19. … When it was time for comments from the audience at the Parker meeting, local resident Michael Tsosie spoke to the DTSC officials. He said much of the information was unclear. He added there appeared to be a disconnect between the tribal governments, the agencies involved in the clean-up, and local residents.

Tsosie noted the Fort Mohave government had been in the lead among tribal governments in this matter, but they were upstream from the contaminated area. The Chemehuevi Reservation and the Colorado River Indian Reservation are both downstream from Topock. He noted the Colorado River is a source of wealth for the Mohaves and their way of life. He added they’ve been here since the beginning of time.

Tsosie said there are already other pollutants in the river, and chromium should not be added to the mix.

Whatever they did, Tsosie said the agencies involved should always bear in mind there are real people being affected by what they do.

“Remember, we are just like you,” he said. “We’ll have to live with what you do.”

Norman Shopay, who owns property in Lake Havasu City, also spoke at the meeting. He asked that DTSC extend the public comment period. He said he had not been able to find the documents in some of the local libraries.

Shopay said that, when he found the documents, they were difficult to read and understand. He suggested a special meeting to explain to people how to go through the documents.

A spokesman for PG&E, Jeff Smith, told the Pioneer the company endorses the whole process. He added they’ve been making some remediation efforts on their own for some time. He said it was important to the company to have the area cleaned up, and they wanted to take into consideration the concerns of all the parties involved.

Once the comment period is over, DTSC officials will review them and make needed revisions to the plan. The actual start of the remediation efforts should be in 2013.

Comments can be sent to Aaron Yue, Department of Toxic Substances Control, 5796 Corporate Ave., Cypress, Calif., 90630. His e-mail is Ayue@dtsc.ca.gov.

TODAY … WATER IS NOTHING MORE THAN A COMMODITY IN AMERICA … SO IT’S REALLY SIMPLE .. JUST FOLLOW THE $$$ …

A Perspective … in the end it’s all about disclosure & transparency

… With America’s prodigious appetite for water … do you believe “we” will actually share … yea, sure …?

World’s Water Supply: Here Are the Haves and Have Nots

By Jaymi Heimbuch, TreeHugger … Posted on June 29, 2010, Printed on July 5, 2010 … http://www.alternet.org/story/147373/

British-based risk consultancy Maplecroft has released a new report showing which countries have the most precarious and stable water supplies. The report is intended to help guide investors, underscoring just how serious water supply is getting when it comes to the world economy.

From farming to manufacturing, investors in various industries are starting to seriously weigh where they put their money based on how secure water supplies are or will be, and companies with interests in areas with unstable water supplies are having to put water efficiency in a place of priority.

Though it focuses on areas of risk, the report also reveals whole new areas in water where investors may want to pile in funds.

Reuters reports, “African nations led by Somalia, Mauritania and Sudan have the most precarious water supplies in the world while Iceland has the best, according to a survey on Thursday that aims to alert companies to investment risks…

A “water security risk index” of 165 nations found African and Asian nations had the most vulnerable supplies, judged by factors including access to drinking water, per capita demand and dependence on rivers that first flow through other nations.”

Maplecroft writes, “The index is one of over 100 created by Maplecroft to identify risks across supply chains, operations and investments of multinational companies and has been developed by measuring the four key areas surrounding the issue. These include: access to improved drinking water and sanitation; the availability of renewable water and the reliance on external supplies; the relationship between available water and supply demands; and the water dependency of each country’s economy.”

Water wars and civil upsets are a real concern in areas where supplies are slim. For instance, CEO of Maplecroft Alyson Warhurst warns,

“The fact that Pakistan and Egypt are amongst the most vulnerable nations should send a signal to investors who will need to develop water conservation and security strategies and be mindful of their water use impacts on local communities.

These countries also have some of the highest population growth rates in the world, especially around cities, so there is an urgent imperative for renewed policy action underlined by these results.”

This is a big warning to companies with interests in these areas that they need to minimize their water footprint, and fast. Also, while this could mean investors direct funds elsewhere for some industries, it simultaneously uncovers new areas of investments for water efficiency and generation. The study points out that 70% of fresh water consumption goes into irrigation.

So, more intelligent irrigation techniques and supplies for farming, water generation and purification technology, and other possibilities for investors are opening up.
Even in areas with strong water supplies, investing in smart water grid technologies is proving to be a brilliant area to invest — experts are pegging it to be a $16.3 billion industry over the next 10 years.

According to the report, water stress was not only a problem in poor nations. The US and Australia are some of the most notable wealthy countries with major water woes. Bulgaria, Belgium and Spain are also feeling the stress of the water crisis.

Jaymi Heimbuch coverrs all things techy, gadgety and green for TreeHugger.
© 2010 TreeHugger All rights reserved.
View this story online at: http://www.alternet.org/story/147373/

TODAY … WATER IS NOTHING MORE THAN A COMMODITY IN AMERICA … SO IT’S REALLY SIMPLE .. JUST FOLLOW THE $$$ …

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