And of course these for-profit corporate entities will have your interest primarily in their hearts and minds as they investigate “fracking” which their owner$ $upport

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Energy_Technology_Laboratory The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is a science, technology, and energy laboratory owned and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As part of DOE’s national laboratory system, NETL supports DOE’s mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States. Through onsite and contracted research, NETL develops technologies to resolve theenvironmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources. Resolving these constraints is critical to ensure reliable, secure, affordable, and environmentally responsible supplies of energy for the nation’s growing economy. More than 1,200 employees work at NETL’s five sites; roughly half are Federal employees and half are site-support contractors. Major site-support contractors include URS Corporation – Washington Division; Platinum Solutions, Inc.; Booz Allen Hamilton, Inc.; Keylogic Systems, Inc.; Leonardo Technologies, Inc.; Performance Results Corp.; SRA International, Inc.; Ultra Electronics, ProLogic …. And of course these for-profit corporate entities will have your interest primarily in their hearts and minds as they investigate “fracking” which their owner$ $upport …

U.S. to look at effects of fracking on drinking water

Marcellus Shale field in Pennsylvania to be studied

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Associated Press2:51 p.m. CDT, July 11, 2012 …

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/breaking/chi-energy-dept-to-look-at-effects-of-fracking-on-drinking-water-20120711,0,4265239.story

A new study being done by the Department of Energy may provide some of the first solid answers to a controversial question: Can gas drilling fluids migrate and pose a threat to drinking water? 

A company in southwestern Pennsylvania is giving researchers access to a commercial drilling site, said Richard Hammack, a spokesman for the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh. 

The firm let scientists conduct baseline tests, allowed tracing elements to be added to hydraulic fracturing fluids and agreed to allow follow-up monitoring. That should let scientists see whether the drilling fluids move upward or sideway from the Marcellus Shale, which is 8,100 feet deep at that spot. 

"It’s like the perfect laboratory," Hammack said.   Hammack said he believes this is the first time such research has been done on a commercial gas well. 

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