GOOD THING THIS WAS NOT THE CASE WHEN I WAS A KID

…GOOD THING THIS WAS NOT THE CASE WHEN I WAS A KID AS WE ROAD OUR BIKE ACROSS TOWN TO SCHOOL WIHOUT PARENT PROTECTION … THERE WAS NO “STRANGER DANGER” STUFF … SO WHAT DID WE DO OR NOT DO TO CAUSE, BRING ABOUT, MAKE HAPPEN THIS SUFFOCATING ATMOSPHERE…

McDonald’s Fires Woman Arrested for Letting her Kid Go To the Park Alone

Laura Clawson, Daily Kos

The idea that children should never be more than five feet from their parents is getting ridiculously out of control. READ MORE»

 

“There’s a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure truth.” Maya Angelou

Remember it is solely your decision whether this information is sufficiently “vetted” & by whom

 

REALLY QUITE EASY TO UNDERSTAND WHEN YOU FACTOR IN

KIDS…REALLY QUITE EASY TO UNDERSTAND WHEN YOU FACTOR IN THAT UNDER GOP/REPUBLICAN/TEA PARTY DOMINATION IN OUR STATE LEGISLATURE AND YEARS OF A TEA PARTY GOVERNNOR … JAN BREWER … WHO ALLOWED HER MINIONS IN THE LEGISLATURE TO UNDER FUND … CHILDREN EDUCATION … HEALTH CARE … AND ENDORSE FOR PROFIT PRIVATE PRISONS … WHAT RESULTS WOULD YOU EXPECT…?

 

“There’s a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure truth.” Maya Angelou

Remember it is solely your decision whether this information is sufficiently “vetted” & by whom

AN INSATIABLE APPITITE WHEN IT COMES TO THE FUKSUHIMA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

…AMERICA APPEARS TO HAVE AN INSATIABLE APPITITE WHEN IT COMES TO THE FUKSUHIMA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DISASTER THE RESULT OF A TSUMANII BUT WE CHOOSE NOT HOLD OUR ON GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABLE FOR YEARS OF UNREPORTED RELEASES OF RADIATON ON AMERICAN CITIZENS THE RESULT OF ATMSPERHIC TESTING OF ATOMIC/NUCLEAR BOMBS … HEY I LIVED WITHIN 90 MILES AS A YOUNGTER OF THESE TESTS …

EDITOR NATURAL NEWS REPORTS ………Japanese doctor warns "Tokyo should no longer be inhabited" due to radiation contamination (with cesium-137)
http://www.naturalnews.com/046112_radiation_Fukushima_Tokyo.html

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"The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." – Patrick Henry

 

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ALTHOUGH ITS NAME IMPLIES … PUBLIC

clip_image002…ALTHOUGH ITS NAME IMPLIES … PUBLIC … ARIZONA PUBLIC SERVICE IS NOT … IT IS INVESTOR OWNED THEREFORE CHARGED BY LAW TO MAXIMIZE PROFIT$ … APS HAS NOT INCENTIVE TO SERVE YOU AS IT SERVES ONLY ITS STOCKHOLDERS…

 

There’s a government inside the government and I don’t control it." – Bill Clinton

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COME ON NOW IT’S JUST BOYS BEING BOYS

…COME ON NOW IT’S JUST BOYS BEING BOYS…

Strippers sue San Diego police over ‘nearly nude’ photos

07-20-2014  •  Los Angeles Times   ….The strippers were employed at Cheetahs Gentlemen’s Club and Club Expose when members of the police department’s vice squad detained them and forced them to pose for pictures during "raids" 

“There’s a world of difference between truth and facts. Facts can obscure truth.” Maya Angelou

Remember it is solely your decision whether this information is sufficiently “vetted” & by whom

DIGEST THIS IT JUST MIGHT SAVE YOUR LIFE

…DIGEST THIS IT JUST MIGHT SAVE YOUR LIFE…

pH Food Chart

07-21-2014  •  The Health Wyze Report     Alkalizing the body is probably the best thing that a person can do to ensure good health and well being. There is a direct relationship between a person’s pH and the oxygen content of his blood, and a tiny change in pH can have dramatic effects 

"Whoever controls the media, controls your mind." – Jim Morrison

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THE CORPORATE OWNED U.S. SUPREME COURT WILL NOT ALLOW THIS TO HAPPEN

…DO NOT WORRY IF PASSED AND SIGNED INTO LAW BY OUR PRESIDENT THE CORPORATE OWNED U.S. SUPREME COURT WILL NOT ALLOW THIS TO HAPPEN AS FOR THEM CORPORATE PROFIT$ ARE AMERICA’S HOLY GRAIL…

Senate Bill Would Hold Corporate Executives Criminally Accountable for Not Disclosing Lethal Product Defects

 

Mark Karlin, BuzzFlash at Truthout: It is an egregious double standard to hold citizens criminally accountable for causing deaths while companies are let off the hook.

 

Read the BuzzFlash Commentary

 

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"The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." – Patrick Henry

 

…Remember it is solely your decision whether this information is sufficiently “vetted” & by whom…

INTERESTING WE SEEM PERPLEXED WHEN CHALLENGED WITH A PHARMACEUTICAL WHICH APPEARS TO ACTUALLY BENEFIT HUMANS

…INTERESTING WE SEEM PERPLEXED WHEN CHALLENGED WITH A PHARMACEUTICAL WHICH APPEARS TO ACTUALLY BENEFIT HUMANS BUT WE WILINGLY ACCEPT WITHOUT CHALLENGE THE GMO FOODS AND VACCINES PROMOTED WITHOUT AUTHENTIC 3RD PARTY VETTING…WHY…?

The Limitless Drug: What If It Were Possible to Learn Any New Skill as If We Were Children?

 

BY CODY C. DELISTRATY • July 16, 2014 • 5:00 AM  http://www.psmag.com/navigation/health-and-behavior/limitless-drug-possible-learn-new-skill-children-85989/

You’ve heard to start studying foreign languages (and music and reading and memorization skills and more) at a young age, when your brain is better prepared to retain that information. New research suggests a drug typically used to combat epilepsy and bipolar disorder could help us retain that skill even as we age.

When Alexander Arguelles was a little boy and his family lived in Italy, he spent his evenings sitting on the living room floor, listening to his father teach himself languages from old grammar books.

Arguelles moved throughout Europe, North Africa, and India as a child, but did not begin his own formal language training until age 11 when he started taking French at the end of primary school. Later, he double majored in French and German at Columbia University, where he also took courses in Latin, Ancient Greek, and Sanskrit, sat in on Chinese, Russian, and Hindi courses, and taught himself Spanish outside of class by speaking with Hispanophones living in New York City. As his father had done, he endeavored to learn any language that interested him, including particularly challenging and obscure dialects such as Old Occitan, Gothic, Frisian, and Modern Provençal.

“Although I spoke only English as a child,” Arguelles later wrote, “I grew up knowing, naturally and instinctively, that the world was full of different languages and that it was possible to know numbers of them because you could teach them to yourself.”

“The effect was quite specific, which implies maybe there’s potential to develop interventions that are targeted and don’t put the whole cognitive system of the individual at risk.”

Arguelles is now fluent in about 36 languages, has studied 60, and is recognized as one of the world’s foremost hyper-polyglots alongside the likes of Timothy Doner, an 18-year-old Dalton School student who speaks 20 languages; Graham Cansdale, a European Commission translator who speaks 14 languages; and Johan Vandewalle, who speaks 22 languages and has been awarded the Polyglot of Flanders/Babel Prize.

Even though Arguelles did not have any languages mastered except his native English until his early teenage years, the mere exposure to so many languages while traveling as a child set him up for linguistic success.

“The brain’s ability to absorb increases as we know more languages,” Loraine Obler, a professor of linguistics at the City University of New York, told the New York Times. “Having a second language at a young age helps you learn a third, even if they’re unrelated.” In fact, even hearing the sounds from different languages at a young age has been proven to be useful in the acquisition of foreign languages later in life.

Similarly, in music, the ability to identify the pitch class of any sound—e.g. a C flat, a D, a G sharp—with 70 to 99 percent accuracy is incredibly rare (less than about 0.01 percent of the population can claim to have this ability). Known as absolute pitch, this skill must be mastered at a very young age, usually before six.

The reason for this is that the ability to learn foreign languages, perfect pitch, and many other skills that require a sponge-like mind (including reading speed and memorization of unusually large amounts of information) decreases as we age.

Although frustrating for the budding linguist, singer, or intellectual, the idea is that one must lose an ability in order to shore up another. In order to assure that you’ve mastered pronunciations in your mother tongue, for instance, your brain makes it more difficult to speak freely in different accents, and therefore to speak other languages like a native.

“One becomes less proficient or less competent in one domain so as to be better in another,” says Judit Gervain, a research scientist in the Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception at the Université Paris 5 René Descartes, whom I spoke with in her Paris office. Brakes, essentially, are put on neuroplasticity as we age. Clearly, these breaks have evolutionary use, but it is still vexing when we’re struggling to learn new languages, speak with a proper accent, memorize information, or sing and identify pitch later in life.

But what if we were able to maintain this sponge-like neurological ability even as we grew older? What if it were possible to learn any skill as if we were children?

Gervain, the principle researcher behind a study entitled “Valproate Reopens Critical-Period Learning of Absolute Pitch,” found that, with low doses of Valproate—a drug typically used to combat bipolar disorder and epilepsy—the brain’s neuroplasticity could be expanded, thereby reopening the “critical periods” of learning, which lets the subject learn as if she were a child.

For the study, Gervain and her research team created a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled test, during which 24 adult men received either a placebo or a small, safe dose of Valproate. After 15 days, all participants watched instructional videos on how to identify the six musical pitch classes in the 12-tone Western musical system. They were then asked to identify the pitch of 18 discreet piano notes. In order to assure accuracy, two weeks later, after the drug had worn off, the opposite treatment was given to each participant (those who initially received Valproate then received a placebo; those who initially received a placebo received Valproate), and they were again asked to identify the pitch classes.

In both tests, those who took the Valproate scored “much higher” in pitch identification accuracy, the implication being that it is possible to learn a complex skill like pitch identification—something usually obtained only in childhood—simply by taking a pill.

“It’s expected,” Gervain says of the promising results, “that any type of learning skill could be enhanced.”

Yet ethical considerations abound. As this science develops, it is likely that Valproate and similar drugs could be used for personal enrichment, for improving oneself to a near infinite extreme.

It is already clear that those with money are willing to pay for human enhancements—for plastic surgery, for generic nootropics, for “wearables” like Google Glass. It would therefore follow that a drug like Valproate, which could allow for huge leaps in intelligence and abilities, would also quickly become popular among a certain class. One of the problems with this increasingly possible hypothetical—and with human enhancement in general—is that we could witness a socioeconomic split far greater than what we’ve already seen. There would still be the socioeconomic “haves” and “have nots,” but now it would not just be that some have money and others do not but that some would have unnaturally advanced intellectual abilities and others would not.

Although the behavioral effects of Valproate are well researched, the microscopic molecular changes that occur in the brain as a result of Valproate use are not yet as well understood. Obviously, it is dangerous to disrupt cognitive processes and Valproate increases neuroplasticity by unnaturally re-opening the brain’s critical periods. There is an evolutionary reason for the way our brains develop as they do, and it wouldn’t be difficult to potentially disrupt other critical cognitive functions by tinkering with critical periods and neuroplasticity.

But just as the popular psychostimulant Adderall is often used outside of its intended prescription—taken to achieve bursts of intense focus, rather than as a modulator for those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)—it would not be a surprise to see Valproate soon taken in low doses as an aid while brushing up on one’s Latin or “doe-rae-me” scale.

The ability to learn foreign languages, perfect pitch, and many other skills that require a sponge-like mind (including reading speed and memorization of unusually large amounts of information) decreases as we age.

Yet Gervain says her test results showed that it is unlikely that Valproate would be hazardous to other parts of the cognitive system. “The effect was quite specific,” she says, “which implies maybe there’s potential to develop interventions that are targeted and don’t put the whole cognitive system of the individual at risk.”

This is perhaps the biggest breakthrough of Gervain’s study. Previous “cognitive enhancing drugs” such as modafinil (Provigil), dimethylamylamine (DMAA), and methylphenidate (Ritalin)—used by nearly seven percent of university students across the United States—have serious adverse effects with a high risk for addiction and overdose. That’s not to mention that these drugs often do not increase one’s productivity, intelligence, or cognitive abilities unless taken within an incredibly specific therapeutic window where an effective dose and an overdose can be only micrograms apart.

Gervain, however, believes Valproate can be better targeted to specific cognitive functions with fewer negative side effects. Her further studies will concentrate on the specific molecular and cellular changes (not just behavioral) caused by using Valproate.

Arguelles now lives in Singapore with his wife and sons. As one of the world’s best-know linguists, Arguelles spends an average of nine hours each day learning new languages and maintaining old ones. Before getting married and having children he says he used to study for 16 hours a day, doing transcriptions, reading classic novels in their original languages, re-hashing grammar and spelling. It is hard work learning how to speak fluent Afrikaans with a flawless accent or reading the poetry of Rumi in its original Persian.

But Valproate and the future of so-called “limitless” drugs might make that a relatively easy task. Maybe one day we will all speak 36 languages. Maybe one day, we will all be great singers and music critics. Or maybe one day we will spend our time counting cards at casinos and trying to exploit the stock market. Maybe one day we will use improved neuroplasticity to better memorize celebrity gossip and trivial facts. Maybe one day we’ll use “limitless” pills to create an even more segregated society than we live in now. Drugs will be able to do a lot, but how we use them will be up to us—for better or for worse.

 

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"The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." – Patrick Henry

 

…Remember it is solely your decision whether this information is sufficiently “vetted” & by whom…

NO SURPRISE THIS IS ARIZONA HOME TO RACIST SB1070

…NO SURPRISE THIS IS ARIZONA HOME TO RACIST SB1070 … JOE ARPAIO … PAUL BABEU … RUSSELL PEARCE … JAN BREWER…

Arizona charter school teaches from book arguing slavery wasn’t so bad

 

We may have discovered one of the reasons why certain folks in Arizona turn out as they do. It seems the charter schools there can have (ahem) an interesting curriculum.

 

Heritage Academy uses two books by controversial anti-communist author Cleon Skousen — The 5,000 Year Leap and The Making of America — that “push ‘Christian nation’ propaganda and other religious teachings on impressionable, young students,” according to Alex Luchenitser, the associate legal director for Americans United.

Of course, if you attend something called the Heritage Academy I suppose it’s pretty clear what you’re going to get. It’s one of those words that has long since been appropriated to mean … things. Skousen, for his part, is one of the people incessantly peddled by noted history-puncher Glenn Beck, and was known for his let’s-say-eccentric interpretations of history, ones that posited the United States to be a country created by God Himself and that slavery was just America’s way of giving black people Jesus hugs:

 

[Law professor Garrett Epps] noted that “parts of his major textbook, The Making of America, present a systematically racist view of the Civil War,” adding that a “long description of slavery in the book claims that the state [of slavery] was beneficial to African Americans and that Southern racism was caused by the ‘intrusion’ of northern abolitionists and advocates of equality for the freed slaves.”

In The Making of America, Skousen included an essay by Fred Albert Shannon, in which he argued that “if [black children] ran naked it was generally from choice, and when the white boys had to put on shoes and go away to school they were likely to envy the freedom of their colored playmates.”

Teach the controversy, I suppose.

Heritage says it will be de-emphasizing Skousen next school year—not because of his interesting views, but due to school-year time constraints—but they’ll still be teaching from those books. You wouldn’t want the kids to grow up without knowing all the perks of being a slave, after all.

 

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"The liberties of a people never were, nor ever will be, secure, when the transactions of their rulers may be concealed from them." – Patrick Henry

 

…Remember it is solely your decision whether this information is sufficiently “vetted” & by whom…

ARE YOU SURE THIS IS WHAT YOU WANT…?

…TO ISRAEL … PLEASE REMEMBER WHAT GOES AROUND EVENTUALY COMES AROUND … ARE YOU SURE THIS IS WHAT YOU WANT…?

These are the images from Gaza that are too graphic for many US news outlets to publish

07-21-2014  •  globalpost.com/   ..After two weeks of violence between Israel and Hamas, the death toll has passed 500. At least 496 Palestinians have been killed by Israeli air and ground strikes, including 100 children, and more than 3,000 have been wounded.

 

Israeli Gaza Invasion
Mike Renzulli
   Actual footage of Israeli troops thwarting terrorists sneaking into Gaza, terrorists using homes to fire on Israeli troops and Hamas intentionally using civilian areas to hide weapons in order to put them in danger.

Israel Kills – For the Fun of It
07-18-2014  •  Antiwar.com
This kind of thing has been happening ever since the fighting started – just as it happened all those other times the Israelis have taken out their sadistic impulses on Gaza’s sitting ducks.

 

"Whoever controls the media, controls your mind." – Jim Morrison

Remember it is solely your decision whether this information is sufficiently “vetted” & by whom

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