If you are not unquestioningly wiling to fall on your sword then do not, I repeat do not choose to run for any elected office…

…Mr. Flake summarized for me what it takes to be an elected official in any capacity in America today…

…If you are not unquestioningly wiling to fall on your sword then do not, I repeat do not choose to run for any elected office…

…Common courtesy is no longer part of any political dialog nor is extension of common courtesy to another human being … we have allowed  on our watch it to become a dog eat dog environment … Yea, assault is tolerated, perhaps even encouraged.

 

Sen. Jeff Flake: ‘It’s time we all say: Enough’

 

Posted on October 25, 2017 by ….After announcing that he will not run for reelection on Tuesday in a dramatic Senate floor speech, Senator Jeff Flake follows up with an op-ed in the Washington Post simply titled Enough:

As I contemplate the Trump presidency,

ANOTHER SENATOR ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT AND ATTACKS TRUMP In a stunning turn, Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake announced he will not be seeking re-election in 2018, saying there "may not be a place" for him in President Donald Trump’s GOP. Here’s what this means for Senate Republicans and the GOP as a whole. Take a minute to read his entire remarkable speech condemning Trumpism from the floor. The whole speech and the White House response summed up 2017 in a nutshell. And the Arizona Senate race is now about to be bonkers. [HuffPost] [Tweet | Share on Facebook]

The 5 Best Lines from Jeff Flake’s Withering New Anti-Trump Op-Ed

By Chris Sosa, AlterNet

The senator held nothing back as he used history to condemn the president. READ MORE»

 

AZ-Sen: In a major surprise, Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake announced on Tuesday that he would not seek re-election next year. In explaining his retirement, Flake professed his love for the Senate but, in a speech on the chamber’s floor, decried the "coarseness" of politics in the era of Donald Trump and, without calling out Trump by name, criticized his "[r]eckless, outrageous, and undignified behavior." Ultimately, though, Flake’s decision seems to have come down to the viability of his own political career. "The path that I would have to travel to get the Republican nomination is a path I’m not willing to take, and that I can’t in good conscience take," he told the Arizona Republic.

Flake’s diagnosis of his own woes is not misplaced. Flake has long been one of Trump’s most vocal critics in the GOP while at the same time serving as loyal vote for him in the Senate. This approach earned Trump’s vocal ire and seemed to turn off almost everyone in Arizona, Democrats and Republicans alike: Polls had shown Flake badly losing the GOP primary to former state Sen. Kelli Ward, a badly underfunded fringe figure who herself had lost to Sen. John McCain 51-40 last year, and in trouble against Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema in the general election.

So what will Flake’s abrupt departure mean for Arizona’s Senate race? With Flake running, the GOP was on a path toward nominating Ward, a woman best known for hosting a town-hall meeting about "chemtrails," a bonkers conspiracy theory that holds that the vapor contrails produced by airplanes are actually mind-control chemicals. Several less, ah, exotic Republicans also hadn’t previously ruled out bids of their own, but had they joined in while Flake was still in the race, they might have actually saved his hide by splitting the anti-incumbent vote. Of course, had Flake "survived" in this manner, it could have left him crippled for the general election—and inspired furious Trump supporters to simply stay home.

Now the GOP will hope a stronger alternative emerges, but can this as-yet-unnamed savior make it through even a Flake-less primary, or will the likes of Ward successfully be able to sabotage any such hopes? A, if not the, key reason Flake’s approval rating tanked so hard with Republican voters is because of Trump’s relentless attacks, so can any replacement avoid stoking Trump’s wrath for an entire year? As CNN notes, Trump has now personally attacked one in five GOP senators. Anyone seeking to step into Flake’s shoes might fare no better.

However the GOP sorts itself out of this mess, Democrats will stay on the offensive. Arizona, which voted for Trump by a slim 48-45 margin—the closest presidential result in the state in two decades—is one of just two states where Democrats have a good chance to pick up a Senate seat from the GOP, and Sinema is a top recruit. But no matter what happens here, Republicans have to be worried about what it means when a scandal-free, 54-year-old first-term senator decides to call it quits rather than face his party’s base. Plenty of other incumbents might just feel the same way.

Now Jeff Flake can listen to his conscience, not his consultants.

The Trumpists feel triumphant and emboldened after the Arizona Republican senator announced that he will not seek reelection. Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon quickly claimed Flake’s scalp as his own. “Many more to come,” he texted a Washington Post reporter last night.

But a much better outcome for President Trump would have been if Flake ran and lost in the primary. Public and private polls showed that he was deeply vulnerable to a challenge from anyone aligned with the administration.

Flake was building up a serious campaign apparatus, and his advisers were telling him that he had to be cautious. If he had decided to take his chances, the senator’s critiques of Trump would have been very measured. If he subsequently lost in a primary, it would be much easier for the president’s allies to dismiss future attacks as sour grapes from a senator scorned.

 

 

‘Dangerous,’ ‘utterly untruthful’: Two retiring GOP senators sound alarm on Trump

The remarks from Flake and Corker further escalate the civil war roiling the GOP ahead of the 2018 midterms.

By Robert Costa, Philip Rucker and Sean Sullivan  •  Read more »

 

Democrats face risks and opportunity with Flake’s exit

The party is all in to win Arizona’s Senate race, but progressives want more.

By David Weigel and Ed O’Keefe  •   Read more »

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